Tag: Weapons Training

The Most Versatile Weapon – Staff Workshop

Dennis M - Sam B Bagua Staff 15Jul15 9a

The staff is one of the most ancient and versatile weapons –

Learn practical techniques and strategies to improve strength, coordination, power, and how training with this weapon correlates with bare-handed self defense as well as being able to use walking sticks, gardening tools, brooms, mops and pool cues as effective self-defense weapons!

Dennis M - Sam B Bagua Staff 15Jul15 12a

We will be learning single and double ended staff techniques and strategies, as well as various sensitivity drills, strikes, locks and throwing methods using a staff to its fullest potential!

Dennis M - Sam B Bagua Staff 15Jul15 28a

 

Please bring your own staff to the event!

When: Sunday, August 16, 2015

12:30pm-2:30pm

Held at

Seattle Asian Medicine and Martial Arts 
12025 Lake City Way NE, Suite B
Seattle, Washington 98125

Dennis M - Sam B Bagua Staff 15Jul15 30a

Pre-registration $30
Day of event $40
Click Here to Register Online!

Update, July 25, 2015 –

How to Find Your Own Staff

You do need to bring your own staff to this event to train with, and to practice with after you attend the workshop. It’s best to buy the staff locally, in person, instead of ordering from a catalog or online, because you need to double check the following:

  1. The ideal length of the staff should be at least as long as coming up from the floor to your chin, or the top of your head when standing (usually between 5 to 6 feet long, longer is ok, but avoid getting something too short). Another test is if you hold the staff horizontally, balancing it at shoulder height along your outstretched arms, you should barely be able to touch the ends of the staff with your extended fingertips.
  2. The ideal diameter of the staff should be at least 1-1/8 inches to 2-1/4 inches — if it’s too thin, it will snap during training.
  3. The staff should be made of hardwood – it should pass “the thumbnail test” (you shouldn’t be able to dig your thumbnail into the wood). Pine and bamboo are unacceptable because they aren’t hardwood — Pine dowels won’t work, they will splinter and crack under the very lightest training. Suggested woods are Hickory, Maple, Oak, Waxwood, Ironwood, Treated Rattan, etc.
  4. One shop option is Seattle Martial Arts Supplies, located on King Street at the South end of Seattle’s Downtown International District. Another option is your local hardware store – Ace, Lowes or Home Depot, etc – go to the section with hardwood broom and shovel handles, and get a straight, un-tapered Hickory broom/mop/shovel handle — it will probably be cheaper and more durable than some of the maple and oak staffs in the martial arts shops (make sure it is at least 5 feet long and at least 1-1/8 diameter, and use the thumbnail test in #3 to make sure it isn’t Pine).
  5. Make sure the staff isn’t cracked or has splinters. Check to make sure there aren’t large “eyes” in the grain – it’s common for stress-fractures in the staff around these brittle areas when subjected to regular training – even with hardwood. Avoid staffs with fancy engraving along the shaft, as they lend to cracking and splinters during practice.
  6. Make sure the staff isn’t warped – look down the shaft from one end to check if it’s warped or bowed. Warping in the wood throws off the balance of the staff and makes it unwieldy.

If you have any  questions, please don’t hesitate to ask!